April newsletter: translating idioms, ré nao & our monthly poll: effect or affect?

Welcome to the LEaF newsletter

Happy Wednesday morning and welcome to LEaF’s April newsletter. This month we are featuring one of our most popular guides – all about translating idioms. Sayings are one of my favourite things about languages and it is only when you think about how you might explain them to a non-native speaker (or how to translate them) that you realise quite how bonkers some of them are: “keep your eyes peeled” and “cut off your nose to spite your face” are too particularly graphic examples that sound fairly hideous when you consider the literal meaning… As ever, enjoy the content and do get in touch – either directly or via our Instagram or LinkedIn accounts – if you have any thoughts or feedback, or just want to say hi!

Lucy – Founder of LEaF Translations



The ultimate guide to translating idioms
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pexels photo 745988.jpeg LEaF Translations

Although idioms are such a big part of language, they can cause headaches for many translators. In reality they are just a bunch of words that, when you look at the literal meaning, make absolutely no sense. Each language has its own idioms, or different versions of the same ones, so translating them literally is just out of the question. So what do we do? Check out the guide to find out more. 


Word of the month

Here at LEaF Translations, we would consider ourselves as ré nao. We feel so lucky to work with so many new clients and businesses across the world every day.

If this is something you would like too, we can help with the translation of websites or marketing materials to make your resources welcoming to a broader audience.



LATEST NEWS
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  • With the world opening back up again, we would like to remind you about our COVID Language Hub. Not only have there been many lifestyle changes due to COVID, we now also have new words as part of our vocabulary. We have recently posted a mini series of COVID-related language (face mask, sanitiser, vaccine) on Instagram that will be useful for your travels, especially for current and upcoming trips this Easter.
  • If you want to know how you can make your business more sustainable, check out this article that Lucy recently featured in. You will find many helpful tips on how to reduce your negative impact and increase your positive impact on the environment. 
  • This Earth Day (22nd April 2022) we will be launching our ‘Turn Over a New LEaF’ Challenge to help you live a more sustainable lifestyle. The challenge will run over 4 weeks, each week we will introduce a list of changes you can make to daily life to have a more positive impact on the environment. Make sure to follow the challenge on our InstagramLinkedIn and blog – #LEaFChallenge.

What do you think?

In last month’s poll, we asked you:

“He didn’t think the weather would ___ his mood so much”

1) effect or 2) affect

The difference between these two words is one that many people get confused but the majority of those responding to our polls got this one right – 89% on LinkedIn and 100% on Instagram!

For those who are unsure, the correct answer is affect. This is because it is a verb, whereas effectis a noun. In this sentence a verb is needed, meaning affect fills the gap.

Head to our Instagram Highlights and LinkedIn for this month’s poll:

With our Turn Over a New LEaFChallenge coming soon, we are curious to see how sustainable you think your lifestyle currently is. So our question for you this month is:

Do you actively make an effort to lead a sustainable lifestyle?

1) Yes, I try my best 
3) I could do better 
4) No, I’m not interested


We hope our challenge can give you some inspiration for simple swaps that you can make.



Introducing: Hotel Villino
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Hotel Villino is a family run hotel, restaurant and gardens based near the small town of Lindau, Germany. Here at LEaF, we translated their website and marketing materials from German into English. Check out their website here.


Kitty LEaF blog 2021

About the Author

Kitty

Kitty Trewhitt is a translation project manager at LEaF Translations. She oversees each phase of the translation project and keeps in contact with both the client and linguists throughout the process. Besides managing our projects, Kitty also translates and proofreads texts from French and Italian into English, as well as creating LEaF’s monthly newsletter and managing the company social media accounts.